Landing Zones, Long-term Desires, and Impossible Dreams

How do we get from here to where we want to be? Hint: don’t draw a roadmap. The road we’ll travel in six months doesn’t exist yet.

Landing zones

Landing zone: “an improvement that would feel like an accomplishment, as well as a pause point to catch breath, reassess, and plan how to achieve the next better thing.”

Esther Derby, 7 Rules of Positive, Productive Change

Big changes come from small changes. Good thing, since small changes are the ones we can make.

We create the path to where we will be one setpping-stone at a time. The smaller the step, the better.

Find the smallest step you can take that puts you one detectable bit closer to where you want to be — or, to where you have more information to know where you are and how to get where you need to go. Make it specific, so you know when you’re there and it’s time to look around.

Does your site need a redesign? First, improve the help text on a confusing button. Or, add events that show where people are using the interface in an unexpected way.

Small progress is the best progress, and information is also progress.

Long-term desires

Landing zones link “near-neighbor states” with long-term desires.

Esther Derby, 7 Rules of Positive, Productive Change

The bigger states we’re trying to achieve can be less specific than the landing zones we use day-to-day. They can tell us when it’s good enough, and it’s time reprioritize.

Maybe: 80% of customers who start make it all the way through enrollment.

We may still reprioritize before getting all the way up this mountain, but this gives us a direction to look in for day and week goals.

Esther suggests making a horizon map (sadly, this term does not google well) to get from long-term desires to landing zones. Map backwards from the desire by asking, “What conditions would have to exist for this to be true?” until you get to the current state. Then move forward one step, one landing zone, and check in.

Impossible Dream

You might achieve a long-term desire. Then what? You pick a new one, based on your organization’s purpose.

Everyone needs a direction to look in for the next mountain to climb. This purpose should not be achievable, because then your organization should close! We need a Quest, an Impossible Dream.

This is:

  • build better airplanes than the world has ever seen
  • help everyone in the world start their own business
  • advance systems thinking in software until the whole world works better

(It reminds me of John Cutler‘s North Star, and long-term desires are themes in that framework.)

We need a star over the horizon to point the direction, a long-term desire as a big step in that direction, and many landing zones along the way to detect progress and assess the landscape.

Keep commitment-style goals down to the landing zone level, so that we can keep our heads up and pointed toward our star.

A definition of play, and how to live

In games, we choose an objective that has no intrinsic value. Get points, run out of cards, reach the finish line. We take aim, and restricting our actions with rules, because this leads us to actions that we enjoy. Thinking, interacting with other players, running all-out. We play the game because it’s fun. We try to win because that makes it fun. (Some people get happy if they win. But if you don’t enjoy the play, you won’t keep coming back.)

This is play, because the ends don’t have particular value, but the means of getting there give us satisfaction.

We can take this strategy in life too:

Choose the ends that lead you to the means that get you what you need.

I call it a quest, an unreachable star, this aim that we choose not because we expect to get there (that would be a milestone) but because it leads us in useful directions.

The book Obliquity (amazon) explains it well: there are some things we can’t get by aiming for them, such as profit or happiness. So you choose an end (“build the best airplane”) that leads you to means (engineering, research, investment, production quality) that get you what you need in order to keep going (profit). Choose an end (“build up my community”) that leads you to means (forming relationships, organizing, helping people) that get you what you need (joy).

When the end has some intrinsic value of its own, like the airplane, or the community, or operating useful software — then we call it work.

People say “Do what you love.” This is how to do that: find an objective that matters to others, which also leads you to means that bring satisfaction. Some people find hard physical work satisfying, others mental exertion, others human interaction. It doesn’t need to be your favorite activity; fun does not equal joy.

When both the ends and the means are fulfilling, then work and play align.

Each milestone (produce an engine, get someone to like you, code up a feature) has many routes to reach it. If you aim for the quickest route, you might end up messing up your quest (the fastest code is harder to operate) or worse, missing out on what you need (long-term profit is down, the community is poisoned, the work is unsatisfying). How do we restrict our means to the ones that take us toward our quest, not just our milestone? and also give us what we need to keep going?

In games, we use rules. In life, we use values.