Why is CSS a thing?

All I want is a web page. I want this one thing on the left and this other thing on the right — why is this so hard?? Can I just make a table in HTML like I used to do in the nineties? Why do I have to worry about stylesheets? and, why are they so hard?

As a backend developer, I’m used to giving the computer instructions. Like “put this on the left and this on the right.” But that is not how web development works. For good reason!

As the author of a web page, I do not have enough information to decide how that page should be laid out. I don’t know who is using it, on what device, in what program, on what screen, in what window, with what font sizes.

You know who does know that stuff? The user agent. That’s a technical term for an application that presents documents to people. The browser is a user agent. The user agent could also create printed documents, or it could speak the document to a person whose eyes are unavailable.

The user agent runs on a particular device. Computer, phone, TV, whatever. It knows the limitations of the hardware. It can be configured by the user. The user agent can conform to various CSS specifications.

CSS is not a programming language. It is a syntax for rules, rules which give the browser (that user agent) clues about how to display the document. The browser combines that information with what it knows about the world to come up with a format to display (or speak) the document.

It turns out that rule-based programming is hard. It sounds like it should be easier than imperative code, but it is not.

So no, you don’t get to decide that this thing goes on the left and that thing goes on the right. The browser gets that choice.

But here’s something I learned yesterday: put each thing in a div, and give those divs display: inline-block. then the browser has the option of putting them next to each other, if that fits with those constraints that only it knows.