When the db is the interface

There are two huge sources of inertia in software: data, and interfaces.

When two systems connect to the same database, you combine both. Ow.

When some other system is doing reporting on my database, I can’t change my table structure. That severely limits any internal reorganizations I might do. Especially when I don’t know how they use it, so I am afraid to touch it.

Then what if it’s a schemaless database? This means the schema resides in the application. When the schema resides in two applications at once, designing change is an exercise in hope.

Sometimes two systems access the same database because the database is the interface. We have an example of that at Atomist currently: one system (called squirrel, I don’t know why) populates a database, and another system (I call it org-viz) uses that data to make visualizations. How can that be okay?

Database as interface is not horrifying when:

  1. The database is not the system of record. We could repopulate all or part of it from elsewhere, so it’s somewhat disposable.
  2. The database has a schema. Interfaces must be well-defined.
  3. One system updates, the other reads.

In our case, we use PostgreSQL, so we have a schema. Some of our fields are JSON, which gives us extensibility, while the essential fields are guaranteed. The populating system (squirrel) operates from a queue, and we can replay the queue as needed, or play it into multiple databases. There are options for designing change.

Database as an interface is never going to be the cleanest decoupling, but it is not unreasonable when it is carefully designed and the teams don’t mind talking to each other. When the database is accidentally an interface, then you’re horked.